Wayne D. Moore

Fire/Life Safety Columnist and Freelance Writer

MOORE, a licensed fire protection engineer, frequent speaker and an expert in the life safety field, is a principal member and past chair of NFPA 72, Chapter 24. Moore is a vice president with JENSEN HUGHES at the Warwick, R.I., office. He can be reached at wmoore@jensenhughes.com.

Articles by Wayne D. Moore

May 2015
Recently, a fire occurred in an 11-story apartment that primarily housed elderly people, although it was not labeled as a senior living building. Six people died and multiple people were injured as a result of the fire. Constructed sometime in the 1960s, the building owners had its fire alarm system replaced about 7 years ago. READ MORE
April 2015
“Where will you be 10 years from now if you keep on going the way you are going?” Napoleon Hill, one of the great writers on success, famously asked this question. When you apply it to the fire alarm and signaling business, it should give you pause.
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April 2015
Designers, contractors and authorities having jurisdiction often misunderstand the term “survivable.” They presume it means the installer has chosen to use either a Class A wiring scheme or has placed the circuits in metal raceway.
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March 2015
The model building code treats campus dormitories as residential occupancies. However, a dorm does not function the same as a commercial apartment building. In some cases, the architect has created a physical design to accommodate as many students as possible. Unlike a commercial apartment, the owner of a dormitory—normally the college or university—imposes many regulations on the occupants. READ MORE
February 2015
It is a sign of tight budgets when facility directors at most K–12 and higher education institutions receive mandates to defer maintenance on their existing building inventory to allow for budget dollar application elsewhere. You are aware that, when a facility postpones needed maintenance, the reliability of its system will deteriorate, often with disastrous consequences.
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February 2015
If you spend any amount of time in our industry, you are well aware that all codes and standards change, usually on a three-year timetable. READ MORE
January 2015
When a potential client calls on you to provide a fire alarm system, do you assume the design responsibility? If so, what resources do you use?
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December 2014
As most of you know, the codes and standards for fire alarm and mass notification systems change on a three-year cycle. New technology and more refined occupant needs top the list of reasons for most changes. Over the years, the requirements for visible notification appliances (strobes) have changed to keep up with new research and the development of technology. READ MORE
December 2014
The predictions have arrived! Analysts expect the first quarter of 2015 to show a rapid rise in commercial construction. Obviously, this is good news on almost all fronts. This report means contractors will have more work, and, on the life safety side of construction, contractors will install more integrated systems to protect people and the built environment.
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