Tom O'Connor

Safety Manager

Tom O'Connor is safety and regulatory affairs manager for Intec, a safety consulting, training and publishing firm that offers on-site assistance and produces manuals, training videos and software for contractors. He has significant experience working with national and international trade associations with an expertise in government affairs. Reach him at toconnor@intecweb.com.

Articles by Tom O'Connor

March 2014
In recent years, thousands of occupational fatalities and injuries have occurred as a result of electrical contact. Many of these accidents happen when workers do not use the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) for the job or they use it improperly. The hands are one of the most critical body parts that need to be protected when working on or near energized equipment.
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February 2014
Fires and explosions in the workplace result in nearly 200 fatalities and injure some 5,000 workers every year. The resulting costs of such incidents reach more than $2 billion annually. As a result, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has some basic requirements for fire prevention and protection. READ MORE
January 2014
The current economic climate in Washington, D.C., is uncertain at best. Last minute approval of the federal budget in late December would seem to offer a little more insight into how the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will operate in 2014. However, the Congressional Appropriations Committees still need to determine how much each agency will receive. READ MORE
January 2014
Slips, trips and falls are the second leading cause of death in the workplace and account for more than 1 million hospital visits in the United States each year. During the winter months, hazardous weather conditions greatly increase the risk for such incidents. READ MORE
December 2013
In August, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that included modifications to a 40-year-old-plus standard that addresses respirable crystalline silica exposure limits and other silica-related hazards. If finalized, OSHA believes that the rule will save nearly 700 lives and prevent up to 1,600 cases of silicosis each year. 
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