Michael Johnston

Executive Director of Standards, NECA

Michael Johnston is NECA’s executive director of standards and safety. He is chair of the NEC Technical Correlating Committee. He served as a principal representative on NEC CMP-5 representing IAEI for the 2002, 2005, and 2008 cycles and is currently the chair of CMP-5, representing NECA for the 2011 NEC cycle. Mike is a member of the IBEW and has experience as an electrical journeyman wireman, foreman and project superintendant. Mike worked for the International Association of Electrical Inspectors (IAEI) as the director of education, codes and standards for almost 10 years. He also worked as an electrical inspector and electrical inspection field supervisor for the city of Phoenix, Ariz. Johnston is an active member of IAEI, the NFPA Electrical Section, Education Section, the UL Electrical Council, and National Safety Council. Reach him at mjohnston@necanet.org.

Articles by Michael Johnston

June 2014
An electrical contractor recently requested information about the required emergency disconnects for a motor-fuel-dispensing facility. The questions related to whether the emergency power off (EPO) had to disconnect the neutral (usually the grounded conductor) in addition to all the circuit conductors feeding the dispensers and fuel pumps. READ MORE
  • The NEC requires an effective ground-fault current path for medium- and high-voltage services.
May 2014
Part X of Article 250 in the National Electrical Code (NEC) provides the grounding requirements for systems and circuits of greater than 1,000 volts (V). There are various methods to accomplish the grounding required for medium- and high-voltage systems, and Part X also includes important rules for grounding medium-voltage cable shields. READ MORE
May 2014
During a recent training program on the National Electrical Code (NEC), a question arose about panelboards and whether they could be installed in a horizontal orientation rather than vertically. This has come up often, probably due to various home-improvement broadcasts that are produced in Canada. READ MORE
April 2014
Recently, a question came up regarding installing overcurrent protection for dry-type transformers rated less than 1,000 volts (V). The transformer installation is a 150-kilovolt-ampere, three-phase unit with a 480V primary and a 208Y/120V secondary. The transformer is being installed in a mechanical room, and the ambient temperature in the room will normally be kept at or below 86°F. READ MORE
March 2014
Energy management is becoming commonplace in today’s electrical infrastructures through the control of utilization equipment, energy storage and power production. Yet, limited consideration is found in electrical installation standards to actively manage these systems. READ MORE
February 2014
At a recent National Electrical Code (NEC) update seminar, 
I was asked about the new requirements to install a grounded (neutral) conductor in a box for switches that control lighting loads. READ MORE
January 2014
At some properties, a single electric utility service supplies multiple buildings or structures. The service could directly supply one of the buildings, and feeders or branch circuits supply other buildings from that service equipment. READ MORE
  • Figure 1: 10-foot feeder tap
December 2013
Someone recently asked me to explain the differences between the 10-foot tap rule and the 25-foot tap rule as they apply to feeders. An additional question was raised about connecting multiple taps to the same feeder using both the 10- and 25-foot tap rules. Using examples helps simplify the approach to properly applying the National Electrical Code (NEC) tap rules. 
 Conductor protection
 READ MORE
November 2013
This article is a continuation of a concise and complete review of some of the more significant changes that have been incorporated into the 2014 edition of the National Electrical Code (NEC). This segment takes a look at some significant revisions in chapters 4 through 6. READ MORE

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