Mark C. Ode

Fire/Life Safety Columnist and Code Contributor

Mark C. Ode is a staff engineering associate at Underwriters Laboratories Inc., based in Peoria, Ariz. He can be reached at 919.949.2576 and mark.c.ode@us.ul.com.

Articles by Mark C. Ode

July 2010
Electrical construction has always been a dangerous profession, so finding ways to make the work less hazardous is certainly the goal of the National Electrical Code (NEC); Underwriters Laboratories; the Occupational Safety and Health Administration; NFPA 70E, the Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace; the National Electrical Manufacturers Association; the National Electrical Contractors READ MORE
June 2010
Recently, i witnessed an electrical inspector and a group of electricians discussing the effectiveness of the bonding and grounding path where raceway fittings are used to connect raceways to threaded hubs, threaded bosses or conduit bodies. Although this is a fairly common practice in the field, the discussion revealed varied opinions on the acceptability of these installations. READ MORE
May 2010
Recently, a question was raised about where the means of egress from a working space started and stopped based on changes that occurred in 110.26(C)(3) for 600-volt (V) or less installations and in 110.33(A)(3) for more than 600V installations in the 2008 National Electrical Code (NEC). READ MORE
April 2010
An increasing number of occupancy sensor switches, involving infrared sensing, are being installed in commercial, residential and industrial installations to cut power usage and comply with energy conservation codes. READ MORE
February 2010
A recent addition to the 2008 National Electrical Code (NEC) has prompted a possible change for the 2011 NEC and a number of questions from electricians, electrical contractors, electrical inspectors and electrical engineers. READ MORE
January 2010
Recently on a cross-country flight, I noticed the incredible number of alternative power sources that are in the process of being installed or have already been installed and are in operation. From the air, it was easy to recognize why the wind generators are placed in long lines along cliffs and in areas where natural air movement power the generators. READ MORE
November 2009
Based on a new requirement in Section 210.8(B)(5) of the 2008 National Electrical Code (NEC), all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed within 6 feet or 1.8 meters of the outside edge of a sink in a commercial or industrial facility must be covered by ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection for personnel. READ MORE
October 2009
The 20th and 21st centuries have seen many changes in gasoline stations. READ MORE
September 2009
The purpose of ground-fault protection on temporary wiring installations during construction, remodeling, maintenance, repair or demolition of buildings, structures or equipment is to ensure personnel protection. Section 590.6 re-quires ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection for any temporary power source supplying electrical equipment on the job site. READ MORE

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