Diane Kelly

Safety Columnist

Diane Kelly is a safety and health specialist with Intec, a safety consulting, training and publishing firm that offers on-site assistance and produces manuals, training videos and software for contractors. She can be reached at 800.745.4818 or dkelly@intecweb.com.

Articles by Diane Kelly

February 2009
What is ergonomics, and what does it mean to the average construction worker on the job site? Ergonomics is the science of designing equipment to maximize productivity by reducing operator fatigue and discomfort while doing the job. This involves finding the best fit between the worker, the job and any equipment being used. READ MORE
January 2009
OSHA’s "6-foot rule" for fall protection is pretty straightforward. It states that if any employee is in a situation where they may lose balance and fall to a lower level or simply fall 6 feet or more, fall protection must be provided and used. So why is fall protection consistently included in OSHA’s top 10 most frequently cited violations? READ MORE
December 2008
Portable generators supply electricity where none is available. They commonly are used following natural disasters and at construction sites. Portable generators produce electricity with an internal combustion engine that is run on a fuel source, usually gasoline, diesel, kerosene or propane. READ MORE
November 2008
Tools, both hand and power, are found at every job site regardless of the trade. While tools are a craftsman’s friends, they bring hazards. The same tool that makes a job easier also can be the cause of an accident. The best way to prevent these accidents is to use tools carefully and keep them in safe operating condition. READ MORE
October 2008
Throughout US history, there have been near-legendary workplace fires. In 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City caused 150 deaths. As recently as 1991, a fire at the Imperial Foods poultry processing plant in North Carolina caused 25 worker deaths and 49 injuries. Tragically, these deaths and injuries could have been prevented. READ MORE
September 2008
According to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the number of declared major disasters nearly doubled in the 1990s compared to the previous decade. This increase brings into focus the need and benefits of being prepared. But the DHS is not alone in its concern and call for preparedness. READ MORE
August 2008
A material safety data sheet (MSDS)—a component of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Hazard Communication standard—provides workers and emergency responders with safe procedures for handling or working with a particular substance. An MSDS contains a huge amount of information that can be very challenging for a chemist, much less someone on the average construction job site. READ MORE
July 2008
When consturction industry insiders are asked to give examples of personal protective equipment (PPE), the list usually includes a hard hat, eye protection, hearing protection, gloves and steel-toed shoes or boots. As the temperature in-creases and days are longer and sunnier, it may be helpful to expand what is considered a PPE. READ MORE
June 2008
According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, falls are the No. 1 killer in the construction industry and the second leading killer in private industry. In contrast to this well-known statistic, employers have always had the responsibility for solving fall hazards at their job sites. READ MORE

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